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Unfortunately, each year thousands of dogs and cats suffer from accidental ingestion of household poisons. Common household items such as foods, medications, chemicals, and plants can harm your pet if ingested. Prevention via knowledge is key to a safe and healthy pet.  Learn how to poison proof your home, and understand the signs and symptoms of dog or cat poisoning.

Based on the Pet Poison Helpline call volume and extensive database, here are the top 10 most common toxins that Pet Poison Helpline gets called about. Now keep in mind that some of these listed are very toxic, while some are minimally toxic (like ant baits and silica packs). When in doubt, call your vet or Pet Poison Helpline to make sure there won’t be a problem. Take special care to keep these toxins out of your pet’s reach and pet-proof your house.

Top 10 Pet Poisons

Dog Poisons:
  1. Topical spot-on insecticides
  2. Household Cleaners
  3. Antidepressants
  4. Lilies
  5. Insoluble Oxalate Plants (e.g., Dieffenbachia, Philodendron, etc.)
  6. Human and Veterinary NSAIDs
  7. Cold and Flu Medication (e.g., Tylenol)
  8. Glow Sticks
  9. ADD/ADHD Medications/Amphetamines
  10. Mouse and Rat Poison

Cat Poisons:
  1. Topical spot-on insecticides
  2. Household Cleaners
  3. Antidepressants
  4. Lilies
  5. Insoluble Oxalate Plants (e.g., Dieffenbachia, Philodendron, etc.)
  6. Human and Veterinary NSAIDs
  7. Cold and Flu Medication (e.g., Tylenol)
  8. Glow Sticks
  9. ADD/ADHD Medications/Amphetamines
  10. Mouse and Rat Poison


Quick Look Up

If you suspect your pet has ingested any of these items or any other questionable substance, call Pet Poison Helpline 855.764.7661 / 800.213.6680 or your veterinarian for assistance. Accurate and timely identification of the suspected substance is very important. Having the container, package, or label in hand will save valuable time and may save the life of your pet.

EMERGENCY INSTRUCTIONS
Did your dog or cat just eat something poisonous? Call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline at 855.764.7661 or 800.213.6680 for help immediately! The sooner a dog poisoning or cat poisoning is diagnosed, the easier, less expensive, and safer it is for your pet to get treated!

What to do if your dog or cat is poisoned:
  • Remove your pet from the area.
  • Check to make sure your pet is safe: breathing and acting normally.
  • Do NOT give any home antidotes.
  • Do NOT induce vomiting without consulting a vet or Pet Poison Helpline.
  • Call Pet Poison Helpline at 800-213-6680.
  • If veterinary attention is necessary, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary clinic immediately.

Detailed Instructions:
  1. Immediately remove your pet from the area, and make sure no other pets (or kids!) are exposed to this area. Safely remove any remaining poisonous material from their reach.
  2. Check to make sure your pet is breathing normally and acting fine otherwise.
  3. Collect a sample of the material, along with the packaging, vial, or container, and save it – you will need all that information when you talk to your veterinarian or to a Pet Poison Helpline expert.
  4. Do NOT give your dog any milk, food, salt, oil, or any other home remedies! Also, never inducing vomiting without talking to your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline – it may actually be detrimental or contraindicated to induce vomiting!
  5. Don’t give hydrogen peroxide to your pet without checking with a vet or with Pet Poison Helpline first. For you cat lovers, hydrogen peroxide doesn’t work well to induce vomiting (it just causes massive foaming and salivating instead!), and stronger veterinary prescription medications are necessary to get your cat to vomit up the poison Kitty ingested!
  6. Get help. Program your veterinarian phone number, along with an ER vet and Pet Poison Helpline’s phone number (800-213-6680) in your cell phone so you will always have immediate access to help.

Keep in mind that the prognosis is always better when a toxicity is reported immediately, so don’t wait to see if your pet becomes symptomatic before calling for help. It’s always less expensive, and safer for your pet for you to call immediately. Remember that there’s a narrow window of time when we can decontaminate (induce vomiting or pump the stomach) in the case of a poisoning.



written by Lora Morris at Expertise.com

This comprehensive pet safety guide includes chapters on food safety for pets, pet-proofing, and natural disaster prep for pet owners. Specifically, you will find the following:





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